• Some Memories of Nripendra Kumar Shrivastava, Gopal Sharan Pandey and Shri D.K. Singla or Shimla 2014

    Friends,

    Admittedly a Blog is a Weblog or a Web Diary of sorts. And what do we do with diaries which we receive around New Year. We carry them around in our bags for a few days, even fill up the first few pages with our names, addresses and other personal details, perhaps even jot a few good deeds done in January, of any given year, and thereafter lose interest in it completely! But why? I have oftentimes asked myself. Do we hate the British Raj and the manners and customs of the West even to this day? That we end up consigning any semblance of orderliness which diaries may impart to work and pleasure alike?

    Thus and therefore, a Web Dairy of this sort may help us accomplish that which the stuffy traditional diary doesn't. Calendars too, as a matter of fact!

    However, why am I penning this post and who indeed are the Gents named above? And, most fully and finally: what is Shimla 2014, Ya?

    (Cont'd.)

    .....................

    Thank you,

    Ajay

  • A List of Recent Publications of Dr. Ajay Pratap during the Last Five Years (2008-2013)

    A List of Recent Publications of Dr. Ajay Pratap during the Last Five Years (2008-2013)

    Books

    1. Pratap, A., Pathak, A.P., Kumar, N., Pratap, R., Paswan, G. (Communicated). Rock Art Imagery of the Vindhyas, Uttar Pradesh, India. Purattava.

    1. Pratap. A. (Communicated). Rock Art and Archaeology of Mirzapur, Uttar Pradesh.

    2. Pratap, A. (Communicated) Indian Edition. Indigenous Archaeology in India: Prospects for an Archaeology of the Subaltern. First published 2010 by Archaeopress, Oxford.

    3. Pratap, A. (In preparation). Mss. Theory in Indian Archaeology.

    4. Pratap, A. (Communicated). Mss. Revised Edition. The Hoe and the Axe. Ethnohistory of Shifting Cultivation in Eastern India. First published 2000 by Oxford University Press. Delhi.

    5. Pratap, A. 2009. Indigenous Archaeology in India: Prospects for an Archaeology of the Subaltern. Archaeopress, Oxford.

    6. Pratap, A. 2000. The Hoe and the Axe. Ethnohistory of Shifting Cultivation in Eastern India. Oxford University Press. Delhi.

    Research Papers

    1. 1. Pratap, A., Pathak, A.P., Kumar, N., Pratap, R., Paswan, G. (Communicated). Rock Art Imagery of the Vindhyas, Uttar Pradesh, India. Purattava.

    2. Pratap, A. (Communicated). Indian Archaeology and Postmodernism: fashion or necessity? Ancient Asia.

    3. Pratap, A. (Communicated). Rock Art and Archaeology of the Vindhyas and its Relationship with the Hinterlands of Eastern India. Proceedings of the National Seminar "Recent Excavations in Eastern India". Directorate of of Archaeology. Government of Bihar. Patna November 11-12, 2013.

    4. Pratap, A. 2013. Some Considerations of Chuna Dari Site 1 (CHD 1): aspects of rock art conservation in India and its presentation to the public. Research Today. 1(2): 57-63.

    5. Pratap, A. (In Press). A Discussion of the Ancient Archaeological Sites and Remains Acts of 1904, 1958, 1959, 1978 and 2010, Government of India, for Adapting them to the Requirements of Better Preventive Conservation of Indian Cultural Property, with Special Reference to the Rock Art of Mirzapur, Uttar Pradesh. Journal of the Indian Association for the Study of Conservation of Cultural Property. Delhi. 2013.

    6. Pratap, A. (In Press). Saints, shrines and religious graffiti. Journal of the Indian Association for the Study of Conservation of Cultural Property. Delhi. 2012.

    7. Pratap, A. (In Press) Anthropology in the Material World: the case of rock paintings at Wyndham 3 or (WYN 3). Proceedings of the Anthropology in the World Conference. Royal Anthropological Institute. 2012.

    8. Pratap, A. (In Press). Faunal Depictions at Wyndham 3: a painted rock art site, Mirzapur, Uttar Pradesh. Proceedings of the National Seminar Archaeology of Central India. Bhopal Circle. Archaeological Survey of India. 2012.

    9. Pratap, A. 2013. The Geography and archaeology of shifting cultivation in India: the current scenario. in Sharma, P.R., Yadava, R.S., Sharma, V.S. (Eds) Interdisciplinary Advances in Geography. R.K. Books. Delhi. Pp. 319-337.

    7. Pratap, A. 2013. A Preliminary Microwear Analysis of Some Artefacts of the Chirand Neolithic. In Dikshit, K.N. (Ed) Neolithic-Chalcolithic Cultures of Eastern India. Indian Archaeological Society. Delhi. Pp. 259-277.

    8. Pratap, A. 2013. A Discussion of Professor Lord Colin Renfrew’s
    Lectures held on the Occasion of the Archaeological Survey of India’s
    150th Anniversary Celebrations. Vikramshila Journal of Social Sciences. Bhagalpur.

    9. Pratap. A. 2012. A Lecture by Professor A.C. Renfrew. Vikramshila Journal of Social Sciences. Part II. Bhagalpur.

    10. Pratap, A. 2012. A Discussion of Professor Lord Colin Renfrew’s
    Lectures held on the Occasion of the Archaeological Survey of India’s
    150th Anniversary Celebrations. Saiddhantiki 5 (15): 134-8.

    11. Pratap, A. 2011a. Recent Surveys at Likhaniya dari, Chuna dari, and Wyndham falls, Uttar Pradesh. Vikramshila Journal of Social Sciences. Bhagalpur.

    12. Pratap, A. 2011b. Prehistoric Rock Art Imagery of the Vindhyas, Uttar Pradesh. In Ancient India. New Series 1. Archaeological Survey of India. New Delhi.

    13. Pratap, A. 2010 (Communicated) The archaeology of childhood: Mohenjodaro Terracotta Revisited. Purattatva 40.

    14. Pratap, A. 2010. Thoughts, things and toys: the praxis of the terracotta art of India. Journal of the Vikramshila Institute of Social Sciences, Bhagalpur.

    15. Pratap, A. 2010. The archaeology of shifting cultivation: the role of highlands south of Ganga Valley. In Tripathi, V. and Upadhyaya, P (Eds.) The Ganga Valley Civilization: Paradigm Shift. Vol. 2. Pratibha, New Delhi.

    16. Pratap, A. 2009. The processual vs. postprocessual archaeology debate: relevance for a theoretical archaeology in India. Purattatva, 39.

    17. Pratap, A. and Kumar, N. 2009. Rock art at Wyndham Falls, Mirzapur, India. Antiquity’s Project Gallery: http://antiquity.ac.uk/antiquityNew/projgall/pratap321/

    Book Reviews

    1. 2012. Review of Paddayya, K. (Ed.) 2007. Formation Processes and Indian Archaeology. Deccan College, Pune. In Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, London.

    2. 2011. Review of M.K. Dhavalikar’s The Aryans: Myth and Archaeology. Munshiram Manoharlal. In Prabuddha Bharat. Journal of the Ramakrishna Mission, Champawat, Uttarakhand.

    3. 2010. Review of S. Venkateswar. Development or Ethnocide. Colonial Practices in the Andaman Islands. Journal of Social Sciences. Faculty of Social Sciences. Banaras Hindu University. Varanasi.

    Digital Resources Created

    Website: http://www.rockartofindia.webs.com/

    Blogs: http://www.archaeologicalhistory.blog.co.uk/
    http://www.archaeologicalhistory.blog.wordpress.com/

    Sd/-

    (Ajay Pratap)
    Professor,
    Dept. of History,
    Faculty of Social Sciences,
    Banaras Hindu University,
    Varanasi – 221 005

  • Rock Paintings Done by Children?

    Friends,

    Some years ago, while at the Indian Institute of Advanced Study Library I stumbled across a wonderful article by an archaeologist who suggested that the role and contribution of Children in the archaeological record has been downplayed, even if children always have been ubiquitous in all societies at all times, and necessarily contribute in several productive and meaningful ways to the societies in which they live! Assuming, the Hunter-Fisher-Gatherer, Pastoral and Agro-Pastoral societies are no exceptions to this rule, and again assuming that at least some of our Vindhyan rock art was generated by societies based on such economic types, it is reasonable to think that the rock art of this region, here and there would certainly reflect the presence of children. Perhaps, through such drawings which western experts have regularly called 'abstract'!

    In this post, I wish to upload some images from our collection of Vindhyan rock art of what we would think or propose as Children's art!

    Wyndham Site 3 or WYN 3

    WyndhamOn2ndOct,10 074

    CAR 3, Morhana Pahar Group I Shelters

    chip 3 022

    chip 3 008

    .................

    Bibliography

    Baxter, J.E. 2008. The archaeology of childhood. Annual Review of Anthropology (37): 159-175.

    Bednarik, R. 2008. http://web.a.ebscohost.com/abstract?direct=true&profile=ehost&scope=site&authtype=crawler&jrnl=08130426&AN=35602602&h=JxTlWhp3xdgNF4gN6uJGUnxIshAledqKTx3dwSa6%2fOVZnfMoNuTgLdb%2bCeSZcR7t9FMbPEMgoKGN3yjU6q624w%3d%3d&crl=c

    Pratap, A. 2009. The Archaeology of Childhood: Mohenjodaro Terracottas Revisited. Indian Institute of Advanced Study. Shimla. Mss.

    Pratap, A. 2010. Thoughts, things and toys: the praxis of the terracotta art of India. Journal of the Vikramshila Institute of Social Sciences, Bhagalpur

    ...............

    Thank you,

    Ajay

  • Some Unresolved Problems in the Study of Rock Art of Mirzapur

    Friends,

    There remain as yet a number of unresolved problems in our study of the rock art of Mirzapur District. These may be enumerated as follows:

    a) Dating: Precise Dates are not available. What are the relevant methods? Given below are a few readings.

    http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1215&context=totem

    http://www.ifrao.com/date/web/index.html

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1475-4754.1992.tb00498.x/abstract

    b) Mapping of Individual Sites and Rock Shelters

    I am told (by Professor Bernard Frischer) that 3 D mapping of rock shelters is an emerging method in the understanding of the spatial distribution and location of rock paintings vis-a-vis the painted shelters. Apparently, these may be generated by GPS Readings in and around rock shelters. We are yet to try the relevant softwares such as Autodesk.

    c) Digital Enhancement of Rock Art Images

    Michael R. Rip has an excellent paper on the value of the digital enhancement of rock art images for discovering more information from them than is otherwise possible. And, here is something on what I recently learnt is called D-Stretch!

    http://www.dstretch.com/

    Two D Stretched Pictures from CHD 1 Cave Site are Worth Two Thousand Words (Pictures Courtesy: Jon Harman)

    Fieldwork on 16th jan 2014a_yrd

    Fieldwork on 16th jan 2014_yrd

    d) Infra-Red Photography of Rock Art

    This helps uncover undiscovered layers of badly faded or hidden layers of earlier paintings submerged under newer super-impositions.

    e) Qualitative Analysis

    In the current phase of our project we have been understaffed and hence could not accomplish a precise count of figures and motifs inside or at every rock art location of which there are some thirty of them.

    .........

    Thank you,

    Ajay

  • A Thought for the Century

    Friends,

    Howsoever briefly I do this, I would like to pose the question and try to answer it to some extent in my own way - what is archaeological fiction? How is it relevant? Who is qualified to write it? Who would the likely readers be? Specialists? The Public?

    Here are some definitions of this phrase or term which are available online:

    http://archaeology.about.com/od/fictionstoriesandnovels/

    http://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/archaeological-fiction

    http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/?category_id=718858

    Okay?

    ..................

    Thank you,

    Ajay

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